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Wadungion Qouniy %oiA & Vine* 
Volume. 2 fcuuck t<fll Neimletien Numb en. J 

Officend ; ?AAdident • Venonlca Madkett 

Vice, pAjeaident * • • ♦ • •••••• {jdwLn Ho /man 

llejconduvg, SecneiaAy ♦ • ••••••«•••«•*••• . . Peggy AdanA 

Tnj&idun&L Vance. Hcudkett 

Publication <£ hcblicily • •.. • VeAonica Hadkeit* 

IJBIWMWIIMJflfltfMIIMI^ 

Note F/tom The ?Ae&iden£ 

Because of lack of Jpace. , ike newleOen will have io include only, ike 4uAnxxne& 
fan ike member of /990 • 

3 would like io ikank eack of ike membend fo/i tending, me. ike. info/unation M that 
ikid booklet could be compiled • 

iftany ikankd goed io Hay. i Beiiie Doll of Dinuba , QalifoAnia fan ike iime and kelp 
that ikey gave io me on ikLd booklei .Without iken ,3 couldn't have had ikLd neady 
at ikLd iime fox you • 

youjt next newdletien will be a negulan one • 

Meeting. 

Wadkingion (jaunty genealogical Society will meet on Sunday, } itfaAck J/^di in ike 
likdkingion [puruty LibnaAy ai J: 00pm .£veAyone i4 inviied .Unlet* ratified different , 
we always meet on ike ladi Sunday of ike monik . 

Quenied 

1. ffly (jAandfaiken Alfred Blount fmj l&L Minnie Hcsrtnond .3 have been iold ikcut /Minnie 
had fr T.B* She & §nandfaike/L wene only iogeiken about a yean befo/ie <ske died . 3 
would love io lexmn wane about ken .She wad OAiginally fnom Baik -please contact: 
/^cuiganet £Hi* B.LedfoAd - 1 10 Albania OnJb/e - Meuponi New* , ViAjginia 2JS02 . 

2. fleed Info on foduuz Phelps (B) ca lj8l p/tobably in Tyjuudl C oun ty ,N*G M ca l80k 
%xckel Hcuuvu .Shontly often i8Qk they moved io Daviddon Qouniy , Tenne&de and wene 
ikene in 1808 . 3n (8 10 ikey wene in Ihtk&ifond (ounty , Tn* wkene they nemained until 
ikeut deaths in ike i860 * a. One known b/ioiken wad SilaA (TLfkelp* (B) ca 1783- N.Q. 
ibu. ^ohxt (\Q>AneJjbjA - P.O. Box IQQ - HWJUUa. , Texaa 7762k 

Welcome. New flembeA* I 
gene. 0. %ih - %ud*. I, Box 1 85 - QumJLL ,/V.£ 27928 
goActon A. Fanptf. - 320 MM. %n 0/u.ve - Vkwieivton. , VUgAnla 22186 
0.%. & (naAOjaAjU Ledfo/td - HO ALbesvta D/tlve. - Newpo/vt Sem , Vlnainla. 23602 



ftemberukip OueA - $10.00 each, o/i $15*00 coupled pe/t yean. . !/eaA begjjia flanuany t ifuiougk 
December Jl. Anyone ^oininy late in ike yean, laltl /ueceive a fall yean f <6 "llkLdkinyion 
Qouniy Ttootd & Vined". Neiu^letteji La mailed monthly & QxenJLeA cute fsiee . LLdt ^unnamed 
when ^oininy • flhhe check payable io Wadki/vpton Qouniy §enealoyccal Society • 

ilfabdkinyion (ouniy genealogical Society 
Venonica Hadkett 
101 Bennett /hive 
PlyiTvutk ,fl.Q 27962 



Jane* Fnanklin Anno Id Qetneieny ( continued fnom pneviou* 



Spnuill , Jacob Spean. ,(apt .Henna Ambno*e ,Jim Davenpont , and Nehemiah Ambno*e . 

When a lange *ionm caused Lake fhelp-d io ovenflow , ail cnop* in the cofmtunity u*ajc 
/uusied . The Annoldd lo*t JO acne* of. com , but luckily. Jim had baAAxll* of. com Aio/ued ) 
in. Ike. bam .He Jiwued with (apt. Henny Ambno4e (2 bcuuiella). The following, yean. Qapi . 
Henny pave, him (j boAAJtlU) in. neium .Jim explained io him that he pave the com io him 
became he needed it and had no intention* of him paying, him bach .(apt Henny looked at 
him a long, time t wiping a lean, fnom hi* eye Mid , "{/'know ,Jim , that' 4 uhat 3 call 
QudLdiJuanity • " 

Jim & fl\antha'* childnen walked (oua. mile* io. Sunday School io Si. David' 4 fixLacopal 
(hunch and attended pneaching at fhiilipi (hunch of (hnidt .Laten. on Sunday School wa* 
*tanted at ThWipi by Daniel Phelp* . 

Montha'* fathen. lived with them .He always tended an acne of flax .She and hen. gjuiLi 
would cand and *pin the flax into thread , fnom which linen could be woven . 

Jim always kept about 2 dogen cow* which wene *heltened at night .Hid boy* would 
take an. ox and cant io ike wood* io load with leaved and Atnaw .Layen* of cow chopping* 
mixed with leave* made exceptional comport in the field* {on. Spning . 

Feed in the inough of the cattle *helten. wad u*ed acconding io the *ea*on .An acne of 
turnip* *ioned in. the bed of *inaw made an excellent Vlintentime feed fo/i the milk cow* . 
The boy* would iwidi the top* fnom the langen. iumip* , io&ding then into the. turnip hou*e 
io be covened with layen*. of *inaw . They would chop the. iumip* with a hatchet ,put the ) 
chunk* into the feed inough fan. ike milk com .Laten. on , left-oven, turnip* in the iumip 
hou*e would *pnout , giving them ienden. gneen* a* a Winientune ineat on the family table . 

3nfo : Dave Annold - 75 l* 1 Tan. Heel Pulpit* 

by Qvanle* D. flbone 
Submitted by : fllany Spnuill Dinkin* 

/.SeoAching patent* of 3*aac B.Ambno*e (B) 2 Oct /822-WSH.Qo. 
(m) i*t Amelia F nance* : Qdldnen. -William Thoma* (Bom) 
/8S5,Jame* Daniel (B) 1 8^?. (m) 2nd Many PanineA(B) l8j) , 

David DoctAine (B) l86l, Richand Fnank (B) t86k,Staten(B) 
l866,geonge Wiley (B) t872,3*aac (B) l875,(onaAnn(B) t880. 
flbved io Beaufont Qo. ca l&Hj, (D)by l885.An old family 
Bible *iaie* he had at leadi one sibling named Mill* F. 
(B) IS 'JO. Anyone having info on ihi* family, plea*e contact: 
(atkenine AJadtle - JDO Quail Ridge Road - Jack*onviUe ,H.Q 2B?6 
2. Seeding any info on Pni*cilla Swain, po**ibly dau of John & ?? Swain (m) Samuel (he**on 
in. I7?8,may have been mentioned in will of John Swain, in. I765 <£ ^ ^ of John Swain 
in 1787 (poAdibly gnandfathen. and fatheA ?)?lea*e *end nefenence* on. "pnoof"- (oniact: 
£ugene (he*x>n. - 6^0 (o*mo* Way - ?ne*coit ,Ani^ona - 86 JO J 




Jame4 FnankLbt A/mold Qemeteny 
Scuppennony Township - Wadhinyton Qounty - Qnedwell , No/uth QoAolina 
Seancked - Januany 9, 199 f by Vance £ Venonica Hadkeii 

Location - filtering, fnom £a*t Main Sineei in Qvzdwell ,/V.(\ -iunn on Old (henny 
food (SR §1155) - Qo 2.9 tott** - Qemeteny Ld on the Aiyhi about 
JOO yandd fnom the /toad • Vou have to go through a cow padtune , then 
iknowgk ike field to the woocid. QemeteAy Ld to ike niyki . 
( info in b/uicketd wad found In Vkbdkinyion Qpunfy. (oaidhoiue . ) 

1. AAruold ,fciAiha - wife of J.F.Annold £ QW.Qlift^n ~(B)28 Nov /8jP (D) 2 fllanck 1921 
fdaugkien of £dna Phelpd & Bailey. AmbAO<deJ - A devoted wife and laving, nvikenrFS:flQt 

2. A/mold Ranted F.-Jn mcno/ty of- *>n of John £ Nancy A/tnold (B) 1$ Oct /8j/ (0)2k Feb l88k 
tienje Ld a man who died later-Tke angeld did with patience wait-ltiiik outstretched anmd £ 
winged of LoverTo take him to ike Maim* above - Footdione : JFA 

game* "Jim" Fnanklin A/wald bought a fanm nea/i Qnedwell 9 $*Q* fnom an old sea captain 
neon when* ke and kid wife , flhniha Amb/tose wenje bo/tn • ftaniha had a daughter , £LLen by 
ken pnevious maAniaye to a man named Qanady • 

Jim £ fthniha named ikeln fbu&t child Jamed often kLd faiken and John often kid gnand - 
faiken .Oiken ckiddnen to thia union wene Jane ,fl)aAy fcligabeih , David Ulilbun , £ AncUew ♦ 

Many £Ligabetk Annald fdaugkien of Jim £ ManihaJ wad bom 1868. She /fannied Anyelo 
QaniJbaldi Sp/tuill which wene ike panentd of flhny Qinkins of Plymouth 

David Ufilbun Annald (ton of Jim £ flianikaj wad bo/m l8j0 and lived to be /OO yju. old 
He wad ike. fuidt made graduate of Atlantic QinJLdiian Q>llege in I9®5$ ^k^ last su/tyiviny 
memben of ike oniginal boand of iuuieed at A(Q , taught school in Fanmville , and wad 
fo/unen fllayon ikene • Dave hod held podioAated at chinches in Q/utenville ,fiLuthan ,Baih , 
anmvLile $ QolddboAO ,Ld$Aange ,plus numb en of nunal ckuncked iknoughoui fadienn N.Q 9 
baptising, W,000- people • 

Jim Annold wad veny nespecied in the conrnmiiy ♦ Uhen buicheniny a yeanling , he f d 
<dend kid bojpd wiik <devenal.poundd of beef to give to ike cloAedt neighbo/u .3f a pendon 
wad didabded , ikey would plow kid land £ plant kid cnopd .Local neighbor* wejut Qonnen 



THE DEMISE OF INDIANS IN NORTH CAROLINA 

by 

Sylvia Whitford 
By 1700 scarcely five hundred Indians remained in the 
Albemarle region. The Algonquian tribes of the area had been pushed 
by the relentless surge of white settlers from Virginia. Some were 
enslaved, others fled south to join the Tuscaroras, an agricultural 
tribe related to the Iroquois, who were themselves feeling the 
encroachment as their hunting territory diminished under the 
onslaught. 

The beleaguered Tuscaroras became desperate when, in 1710 
over four hundred Swiss and German Palatine emigrants arrived to 
establish the town that was to become New Bern, displacing the 
Indian town of Chattoka, at the junction of the Neuse and Trent 
rivers. 

The desperate Tuscaroras sought to relocate to the 
Pennsylvania colony for a "lasting peace". When this failed they took 
the offensive, and on September 22, 1711 attacked all European 
settlements along the Neuse and Pamlico rivers with such vigor it 
seemed they might repulse the invasion of their homeland. 

North Carolina appealed to Virginia and South Carolina for help. 
South Carolina responded with troops and by 1713 the last Tuscarora 
stronghold was taken. The proud Tuscarora nation was no more; 
fourteen hundred were dead and a thousand had been captured and 
enslaved. There were pockets of resistance until a treaty was 
signed in 1715. Most of the survivors went northward to join the 
Iroquois League. The few remaining received land on the Roanoke 
River.in what is now Martin County. 





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Land Q/uobvU - Submitted by : Do/iLd Hoaa&IL SollU (io be continued) 



Name Long, James Capt. 
fnimtv Washington 



r-,ni M 35_jssued 26 Hay 1817 



File Ho. 36 

Acres 130 



Entry No. 158 Entered 15 February 1817 
Book No. 13 1 Page No. 145 



Location H»"Qh B r , Arthur Enadt , fluid PhippiU 

Swp. EzeUe] Lear rY- Thnmss I Pary 

Chain ^ r r^» W1 11 ^ am fhmnn. William toa ds 



Namesppll , .Inmp^ snn nf Tsnm F *l e Xo --£L. 

County UasMngtnn Acres 94 

Grant 36 Issued 2 October 1817 



Entry No. jjjfc 
Book No. 



Entered 25 February 1816 
131 L p «9e No. 200 



Location Deep Swamp 



Chain CarriersJo nn Snell, William Hasson 



Name I p * r ry nnun^ng 



JMIe No. ^tft 



County Washington 



Acres 



200 



C""+_3L_J'« ued 29 November 1817 
Entry No. 130 Entered p fphntary 1815 
Book No. 131 Page No. 350 



Location Smith. Thomas Long. Robson 



Chain Carriers LovIck Learry. Thom as Wiley 

Name WaUer. Thomas * Samuel L. File No._£Q 

Wiggins 

County Washington Acresl/4 & 20 perches 

Grant 39 Issued 18 December 1817 

Entry No. 178 Entered 16 September 1817 

Book No. 132 Page No. 116 

Location In mouth of Roanoke River 



Nameprfltt. Jno. 



File No. 39 



County Washington 



Acres 100 



Grant 38 



Issued 6 December 1817 



Entry No. 136 Entered 11 August 1817 
Book No. 132 Page No. 26 



Location Harked Popplar Swp, Eleazar Swain, Ephr a rt- 
Davenport 

Chain Carriers Ephram Davenport, Jesse Learry 



NameWa^er, Thomas & Samuel L. pj le # 41 

W i gZp7T5 * 

County Washington Acres 9 1/2 



6rant 40 Issued 18 December 1817 

Entry No. 1 73 & Entered 16 Sept. 1817 
178 

Book No. 132 Page No. 116 



location In mouth of Roanoke River 



Chain Carriers Aaron Walker, Mason Wiggins 



Chain Carriers Aaron Walker, Mason Wiggins 



Name Bozmon, Leavan 



File No. 42 



County Washington 



Acres 200 



Grant 41 Issued 18 December 1818 

Entry No. 166 Entered 2 * September 1817 
Book No. 132 p a ge No. 117 



Location npar town nf Plymouth, tapt. Joseph Bozman, 

James & Joseph Weebs, Coward, Corprew, Capt. Joh n 

Armstard, William Fagan,*/ <r#»AP AAmsr+xv 
Chain Carriers Re | |JiV|||| Lu||M> Ddwld t „ i lu , 



NameHnlHrP. Fdward 



Countywashlnoton 



File No. 43 



Acres 64 



Grant 42 Issued 19 December 1817 
Entry No. 165 Entered 10 May 1817 
Book No. 



132 



LocationLevi Blount 



_Page No. ^ 



Chain CarriersJames Davis, Henry Allin 



Name Johnston . Thomas 
County Washington 



J1le. No._i£_ 



NameRe^jU, William 



JUres 82 1/2 ' 



County Washington 



_F11e No. 45 
Acres 2 <> 



Crnnt _^_Tc t npH 20 December 1817 

Entry Hn j±*__Jy) + *»* 26 November 1816 
Book No. 132 Page No. m 



Grant 44 Issued 22 December 1817 1 

Entry No. 144 Entered IS January 1816 

Book No. 132 p ag e No. HI 



l f>f t<nn Beratz. Blount. Albemarle Sound 



Locatlon Cdward Hollice, Colonel Edmond Blount 



ARCHIVES INFORMATION CIRCULARS 
JANUARY 1991 • F0R SALE 

No. 1. "North Carolina's Revolutionary War Pay Records, H by C. F. w. 
Coker and Donald R. Lennon. 50$ 

No. 2. M North Carolina Census Records, 1787-1910, " by Ellen Z. McCrev. 

No. 3. "Records Relating to Tennessee in the North Carolina State Archives, 11 
by C. P. W. Coker. 50? 

No. 4. "North Carolina Civil War Records: An Introduction to Printed 
and Manuscript Sources," by C. F. W. Coker. 50? 

No. 5. "Photocopying, Transcription, Photographic Services, and Document 
Restoration Services Available in the North Carolina State Archives." 
Free 

No. 6. Title deleted. 
No. 7. Title deleted. 

No. 8. "North Carolina Local History: A Select Bibliography," by George 
Stevenson. §10.00 

No. 9. "North Carolina Courts of Law and Equity Prior to 1868," by George 
Stevenson and Ruby D. Arnold. 50? 

No. 10. H A Select Bibliography for Genealogical Research in North Carolina," 
by George Stevenson. 50? 

No. 11. Title deleted. 

No. 12. "Maps and Other Cartographic Records in the North Carolina State 
Archives," by George Stevenson. 50? 

No. 13. "North Carolina Revolutionary War Records of Primary Interest to 
Genealogists," by George Stevenson. 50? 

No. 14. "The Colonial and State Records of North- Carolina and the Colonial 

Records of North Carolina [Second Series]." 15? 

No. 15. "An Index to Marriage Bonds Filed in the North Carolina State 
Archives," by Catherine A.* Jackson. 50? 

No. 16. "Preliminary Guide to the British Records Collection," by Robert 
J. Cain. Out-of-Print 

No. 17. "Preliminary Guide to Records Relating to Blacks in the North 
Carolina State Archives,^ by Thornton W. Mitchell. 50? 

GUIDE TO RESEARCH MATERIALS IN THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE 
ARCHIVES,. SECTION B, COUNTY RECORDS, $10.00 

Department of Cultural Resource please make check payable TOt 
Division of A/chives and Histwy n.c. dept. op cultural resources 

Archives and Records Section _ „ 

109 East Jones Street minimum naxi. order $2. op 

Raleigh. North Carolina 27641-2807 

Submitted by. : flkngoA&t 0, Web^dieA. 



4 a 




SPECTATOR. SEPTEMBER 6. 1990 17 



I Recall It 



Read Their Lips 



8Y NOEL YANCEY 



The first thing the student of North 
; Carolina history learns about Culpepper's 
i Rebellion is that the affair was misnamed. It 
should have been called "Durant's Rebel- 
lion" in recognition of George Durant, who 
I in 1673 led the faction thai carried out one 
of the first popular uprisings in American 
colonial history. What's more, Durant's 
faction emerged victorious — though one 
cannot help wondering what the outcome 
might have been if Thomas Eastchurch, who 
had been appointed governor by the Lords 
Proprietors, had hastened home to carry out 
his duties instead of remaining in the West 
Indies long enough to woo and wed a wealthy 
widow. Instead, he deputized the intemperate 
Thomas Miller to act as governor while he 
dallied. 

Culpepper's Rebellion had its origins in 
the British Parliament's enactment of the 
Navigation Acts, especially the Plantation 
Duty Act of 1673. Among other things, this 
act levied a tax of one cent per pound on 
tobacco shipped from one colony to another. 
This tax had a heavy impact on the Albemarle 
Colony — as North Carolina was then known 
— because the shallow inlets and bays of the 
Carolina coast limited the size of the ships 
that could reach it and Virginia had placed 
restrictions on the sale of Carolina tobacco 
there. As a result, nearly all the colony's 
tobacco had to be shipped to New England 
ports for relay to world markets. 

In 1673 Eastchurch, who was speaker of 
the lower house of the Assembly, was leader 
\ of the pro-Proprietor faction of the colony. 
Miller, an apothecary, was one of his 
lieutenants. Durant, who was probably the 
colony's most influential politician, had the 
strong backing of another influential man, 
John Jenkins. When Governor Peter Carteret 
resigned and sailed for England after finding 
himself unable to quell the unrest thjt 
followed passage of the Navigation Acts, 
Jenkins became acting governor. 

Durant and Jenkins had qo intention of 
enforcing the Plantation Act because k 
interfered with their profitable trade with the 
new England merchants, and they made 
things so hot for Eastchurch and Miller that 
those two fled to England. There they so 
impressed the Lords Proprietors that they 
appointed Eastchurch governor and Miller 
collector of customs. They also directed them 
to enforce strictly all the Navigation Acts. 



This virtually guaranteed the Eastchurch- 
Miller administration would be an unhappy 
one. 

The newly appointed governor and his 
aide then headed back to Carolina by way of 
Nevis in the West Indies, where Eastchurch 
became enamored of a wealthy widow. He 
determined to remain and court her and sent 
Miller ahead with authority to act as governor 
pending his arrival. Perhaps exercising the 
powers of governor went to Miller's head, 
because his actions were so outrageous he 
soon had the colony in turmoil. He enforced 
the levy on tobacco shipments for the first 
time, which should have pleased the Crown 
and the Lords Proprietors, but his methods 
in this and in other matters were such that 
even the Proprietors later admitted that Miller 
"did many extravagant things" and had soon 
"lost his reputation & interest among ye 
people." The crisis came when one of the 
New England traders, Zachariah Gillam, 
brought his heavily armed schooner, the 
Carolina, into port. When Gillam came 
ashore Miller arrested him on a charge of 
violating the Navigation Acts. And when 
Miller heard that Durant was aboard the 
Carolina, he rowed out to the ship, shoved a 
brace of pistols against Du rant's chest and 
arrested him as a "Traytour." 

At this point, Culpepper, the colony's 
surveyor general, got into the act. After 
conferring with Durant, he led a group of 
men, armed with weapons furnished by 
Gillam, in arresting Miller and other officials 
and slamming them into prison. At Miller's 
house they took possession of the customs 
revenues he had collected and the tobacco his 
men had seized. One of the New England sea 
captains took advantage of the turmoil to slip 
away without paying duty on 100 hogsheads 
of tobacco he carried. Calling for a "free 
parliament," they conducted an election in 
which 18 of those who had participated in the 
revolt were elected to the Assembly, which 
chose a council of seven members. Miller 
was tried and imprisoned, and the council 
proclaimed that if Eastchurch came to 
Carolina, he would receive the same 
medicine. (The royal appointee had by this 
time arrived in Virginia — presumably with his 
bride.) To show they meant business, they 
sent soldiers to the Virginia border to 
confront Eastchurch if he attempted to cross 
it. Eastchurch appealed for assistance to the 
Virginia governor, William Berkeley, who 
was also one of the Lords Proprietors. 
Berkeley promised to help and called for 200 

, ^ & ^ 



volunteers for the chore. However, Eastchurch 
died, apparently of a disease he had caught 
in the West Indies, before the effort to install 
him by force could be made. 

Meanwhile, the rebels chose Jenkins as 
acting governor and Culpepper as customs 
collector, restored Durant to his old post of 
attorney general, and set out to govern the 
colony "by their own authority and according 
tb their own model." However, Miller 
escaped and fled to London, where he 
rharged that Culpepper had embezzled 
:onfi seated tobacco and other customs 
Receipts. Culpepper, who had been sent to 
London to counter any charges brought by 
vliller, found himself arrested on a charge 
)f treason. He was brought to trial on 
November 20, 1680, and must have been 

amazed when Anthony Ashley Cooper, Lord 
Shaftesbury, who not only was one of the 
Lords Proprietors but also appeared as their 
attorney, defended his actions. Apparently, 
the Proprietors had concluded that their best 
chance of retaining their charter was to 
demonstrate that "Culpepper's Rebellion" 
was no big deal. Shaftesbury argued that 
Miller had precipitated the colonists' 
resistance by his actions after he had gained 
control of the colony without legal authority. 
He asserted that the "rebellion" was merely 
a dispute between planters and was nothing 
more than a "riot." Culpepper was acquitted 
after the Proprietors gave assurances that 
restitution would be made for the confiscated 
customs receipts. ■ 



SuhrnLbted by ; 
LouLde SiTiLih 




"Y«, U h comforting to have roots" 



Submitted by : 
Jeanne O'fleal 
OT/J ; New yo/iheJi